Doublie Lets You Add a Little Flare to Your Selfies

Want to spice up your boring selfies? Doublie can help.

Doublie

Doublie

The iOS app enables users to choose from thousands of stickers and celebrity cut outs to add a little panache to your picture.

“With a loud, easy-to-navigate interface and ever-expanding overlay gallery, Doublie is the new selfie vehicle that promises to take your social media accounts by storm,” reads the app description on the App Store.

Doublie offers users a large and growing gallery of ready-made celebrity and pop culture overlays that can be inserted into the photos on your iPhone.

Simply choose an image from the gallery, place the filter and snap the new photo. You can also edit contrast and brightness.

“It’s the fun, easy way to photoshop celebs into selfies right on your phone,” the description says.

Doublie is interactive — it can work with Facebook, Instagram and Twitter “as a meme generator for social media or as a kind of self-contained SnapChat, where friends are shooting their Doublies back and forth.”

Doublie is available for free on iOS.

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Doublie Lets You Add a Little Flare to Your Selfies


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By cranbak on October 1, 2014 | Webmaster | A comment
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SearchCap: Google Crawling, CTR Study & Focus On The User

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: Up Close @ SMX East: How Ads Influence Organic Click-Through Rate On Google If the SERPs are a zero-sum game, where drawing a click in one place takes it away…



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Google’s Safe Browsing Service is Killing Your Privacy

Google Safe Browsing is a service through which Google provides lists of URLs (addresses) of websites that contain malware or phishing content.

These lists of suspicious sites are continuously updated using Google’s web crawlers, programs that scour the web to index sites for Google’s search engine.

Lists from the Google Safe Browsing service are used by browsers such as Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and apple Safari for checking web-pages users are trying to access against potential threats.

The service issues alerts when they are about to open websites or content Google has classified as malicious. The warnings are display as ‘visual messages’ along with specific details relating to the malicious content concerned.

The service is also designed to block the downloading of files infected with malware and, once a user’s computer has been infected, it can issue instructions on how to detect and remove the malware.

Members of the public can also access the lists of unsafe sites via a public API for the service. [An API, or application program interface, is a set of instructions that specifies the functions or routines required to accomplish a specific task, such as reading a particular list of websites.]

In addition, Google uses its Safe Browsing service to send internet service providers e-mail alerts regarding threats hosted on their networks.

More than one billion internet users are currently using the Safe Browsing service, either directly or indirectly and, according to Google, it is issuing three million warnings a week.

The service is acknowledged as being highly efficient in protecting users from malware and phishing attacks.

Privacy concerns with Google’s Safe Browsing service

When using Google’s public API (the Safe Browsing Lookup API) to check out a suspicious webpage, members of the public who are concerned about their privacy need to be cautious. The URLs (addresses) to be look up are not hashed (encrypted) so the Google server knows which URLs have been looked up using this API. This makes tracking your online activities ultra-easy.

The Firefox and Safari browsers however use a second version of the API, Safe Browsing API v2, to exchange data with the server. This uses hashed URLs so the Google server never knows the actual URLs queried by the user.

However the Safe Browsing API also stores a cookie on the user’s computer which the NSA (US National Security Agency) uses to identify individual computers. This is a mandatory requirement that many users feel is acceptable as it helps them feel safe.

In addition, Google stores another cookie on the user’s computer that can be used to identify the IP addresses the user visits, ie can be used to track him or her.

Google’s excuse is that the tracking cookie logs this data in order to prevent DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attacks. That may be so.

The API in the user’s browser (eg, Chrome) will ‘phone home’ every few hours to check for updates to its list of malicious sites. At the same time it sends a payload that includes the machine’s ID and the user’s ID.

Should you turn off Google’s Safe Browsing service?

Even if you trust Google not to use your information without your permission or for some nefarious purpose, there is a potential risk that it can be picked up by a malicious third party when it is being echoed back across the internet to Google from your browser.

The only way to prevent this is to disable the Safe Browsing feature in your browser, which is on by default.

This is a real bummer as you would be turning off a great service.

But that’s what you’ve got to do if you don’t want to be tracked.

When making up your mind about whether to turn off Safe Browsing or not, you should bear in mind that even if the information that is tracked is not hacked, it is available to be accessed under a court warrant or at the request of the US NSA.

The good news from Google is that Google only retains the data for two weeks and then deletes it.

Not so, say some researchers, who believe that after two weeks the data is anonymized, ie names and other identifying features are removed, and stored in aggregate form.

If this is true then having just the user’s IP address, the cookie and timestamp would be enough information to decloak someone for something they may have done years before.

So if you use Chrome or Firefox, remember to behave yourself.

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Google’s Safe Browsing Service is Killing Your Privacy


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Paul Kennedy is the marketing manager of Jupiter Support (Ireland). He can be contacted by e-mail to paul@jupitersupport.ie. You can also go to jupitersupport.ie where you can use chat or Skype to talk with a technician free of charge. Alternatively you can call 0766803006 to speak to a technician and get free diagnosis/advice. Jupiter Support only charges a fixed fee of €19.99 to rid your computer of any and all viruses on a no-fix/no-fee basis.

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Up Close @ SMX East: How Ads Influence Organic Click-Through Rate On Google

If the SERPs are a zero-sum game, where drawing a click in one place takes it away from another, how are ads influencing organic click-through?

The post Up Close @ SMX East: How Ads Influence Organic Click-Through Rate On Google appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Network Trailblazer: A Conversation with Eric Allman – Eric Allman talks about Sendmail, the first “killer app” for the networked age, and gives an update on his work now, related to the Internet of Things.

If he had known that most of the e-mail he would receive every day would be unsolicited bulk e-mail, he might have done things differently. Network Trailblazer Eric Allman was the author of delivermail, and its successor sendmail. Delivermail was the mail transport agent (“MTA”) first shipped in 1979 as part of 4.0BSD, a UNIX operating system developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group of the University of California, Berkeley.

Eric Allman

Eric Allman

Allman says he wrote delivermail because UC Berkeley users wanted to use the University’s limited number of ARPANET connections mainly to exchanges messages with other users on the network. Allman’s answer, delivermail, queued and managed the traffic.

Allman makes no claims to having invented electronic mail. History shows that to have been an evolutionary process with many contributors. Ray Tomlinson of BBN Technologies is widely believed to have sent the first ARPANET e-mail in 1971 and to have been the first to use the “at” (“@”) sign to separate the mailbox name from the host machine name. And most computer systems designed to serve many users already had messaging systems. UC Berkeley had such a store-and-forward program. But these systems were limited to a single machine or a network of machines using a common, often proprietary protocol.

Delivermail may have been the first MTA to have a gateway capability allowing it to move messages across network boundaries. Allman retained that feature as the ARPANET evolved from using NCP as its transport protocol to TCP/IP; the messages went from being defined by a FTP command to SMTP; and the ARPANET itself began its metamorphosis into the Internet. After a few iterations delivermail was renamed sendmail.

Allman says that while the Advanced Research Projects Agency had not made the gateway capability a part of its original specifications, it was that distinguishing feature that made sendmail the first “killer app” for the networked age.

 

 

As for Allman’s one regret, estimates of just how much e-mail is sent over the Internet on any given day vary wildly. The Radicati Group, a market research firm, reports 144.8 Billion e-mails per day in 2012. Even harder to get a handle on is the amount of the e-mail which is spam. I’ve seen studies indicating that anywhere from 70% to 90% of total messages are unsolicited bulk e-mail. That’s a lot of waste in terms of network bandwidth, message storage and human time spent sorting through the torrent of messages to find the ones of value. That doesn’t even consider the costs of malware, malicious mail which doesn’t just consume resources but actually attempts to harm mail recipients computers.

Writing on “The Economics of Spam”, our apologies to the Hormel Foods Corp., in the Journal of Economic Perspectives, Microsoft researcher Justin M. Rao or Microsoft Research and David H. Reiley of Google estimate that American firms and consumers experience costs of almost $20 billion annually due to spam. They say their figure is more conservative than the $50 billion figure often cited by other authors, and that the figure would be much higher if it were not for private investment in anti-spam technology.

Allman says that the volume of unsolicited e-mail would undoubtedly be a tiny fraction of today’s figure if some real cost had been placed on the sender. But, he notes the original network had been designed for a limited community of users and that the need to allow for “bad actors” became obvious only when access to the network was opened to the general public.

 

 

The application of specific fees for e-mail now seems to be an idea whose time has long past. We have grown accustomed to “net neutrality” where bits are bits and we don’t discriminate based on what those bits represent. Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates once declared a corporate war on spam. He believed junk e-mail could be curtailed through concerted legal challenges to bulk e-mailers; a mechanism to certify the identity of mailers and perhaps a system giving recipients of unsolicited mail a financial incentive to read them.

Unsolicited e-mail volume growth has slowed in recent years. But Allman believes that is due to the increased use of instant messaging systems such as Internet Chat, Facebook and Twitter. Allman observes that particularly among younger users, short instant messages on smart phones are the preferred way of communicating.  While Allman believes those services are appropriate for many users he does not believe, as some have argued, that “e-mail is dead.” Particularly in business, he says, e-mail has a purpose.

 

 

Today Allman, after a few career stops, is back at Berkeley. There our trailblazer is working at the Swarm Lab, developing applications involving the Internet of Things. He is working specifically on programs to control large swarms of sensors and actuators through the adoption of an open and universal platform. The prospect of virtually everything in our lives, cars, kitchen appliances, clothing, and so on covered with sensors and actively communicating with one another raises many possibilities but also many potential problems.

“I’m pretty nervous,” Allman says, “about drive-by-wire cars that talk with the other cars around them.” But, he says, as soon as it goes live “somebody will be trying to spoof it to make my car believe that the car in front of me is slowing down when it’s not. Allman is excited about working to help usher in this new era in a safe and productive way.

Allman is a recipient of the Association for Computer Machinery’s 2009 Distinguished Engineers Award and is a 2014 inductee to the Internet Hall of Fame.

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Network Trailblazer: A Conversation with Eric Allman


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For more than 20 years, Scott Gurvey was the New York bureau chief and senior correspondent of the PBS broadcast Nightly Business Report. Gurvey conducted interviews with the CEOs of the world’s leading corporations, and wrote a Web column, Public Offerings, for the PBS website. Used with the permission of http://thenetwork.cisco.com/.

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What’s the Secret Service Being Told to Ignore? – RushLimbaugh.com (subscription)

What's the Secret Service Being Told to Ignore?
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Look, I'm asking because I don't know and I'm wondering — this is a pop culture thing, and there are a lot of comedians out there on the Internet that you don't run into. Okay, well …. Now, I just got a note from Koko up at RushLimbaugh.com, the

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Focus On User Group Uses Google Algorithm To Attack Map Pack

Yesterday a new anti-Google consortium called “Focus on the User” launched a website that cleverly uses Google’s own words and algorithm to make an argument against Google+ Local (map pack) search results. It also operates as a concrete proposal that might partly substitute for…



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A New Click Through Rate Study For Google Organic Results

Advanced Web Ranking has released a study showing fresh data on the click-through-rate from Google’s organic search results. The data was taken from Google Webmaster Tools Search Queries reports from large accounts back in July 2014. On average, 71.33% of searches resulted in a page one…



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Google On How They Know When To Slow Or Stop Crawling Your Web Site

Today at SMX East, Google’s Webmaster Trends Analyst, Gary Illyes shared with the audience two technical ways Google determines when GoogleBot, their crawlers, should slow down or stop crawling your web site. One of the more important factors with SEO is to ensure the search engine crawlers…



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How User Intent Will Forever Inform Successful Keyword Strategies

Forget trying to keep up with the thousands of algorithm changes that happen every year. Focus on what really matters and you’re golden.

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