Windows

Windows 8 Maintenance — Uninstalling, Changing and Repairing Programs

Here are three simple maintenance tasks you can undertake in Windows 8 in order to speed up your computer or bring it back to peak efficiency:

1. Uninstalling programs — with Windows 8, or indeed any other earlier versions of Windows, you can increase your system’s performance by uninstalling apps or programs that you don’t use.

2. Changing programs — you can also add or remove features from certain apps or programs in Windows 8.

3. Repairing programs— if a program is not working properly you can repair it.

Undertaking these Windows 8 maintenance tasks yourself will save you time and money. They are quite easy to do if you just follow these simple instructions:

Uninstalling Programs in Windows 8

You should look for apps or programs that you hardly ever use. Uninstalling these programs will free up disk space, giving you improved performance from your computer.

You can uninstall either from the start screen or the desktop.

Uninstalling from the start screen

Follow these simple steps to install an app from the start screen in Windows 8:

  • Press and hold the app (if you are using a touchscreen monitor) or right-click the app tile (if you are using mouse).
  • Tap or click on Uninstall.

If you don’t want to uninstall an app, but want to remove it from your start screen, ignore Uninstall and instead tap or click on the app and select Unpin from start.

Uninstalling from the desktop

Here’s how you uninstall a program or app from your desktop in Windows 8. First you have to bring up the ‘search’ box.

If you are using a touch screen, swipe from the right edge of the screen and then tap Search. If you are using a mouse, point to the top right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down and then click Search. Either way, the ‘search’ box should open. Then:

  • In search, type Control Panel and tap or click Control Panel.
  • Under the View By option, select Large Icons, and tap or click on Programs and features.
  • Select the program you want to install by tapping or clicking on it.
  • Tap or click on Uninstall.

After this, you just follow the instructions shown on the screen.

Changing a program

The change program feature works with apps or programs downloaded from the Windows store, and enables you to add or remove features from these apps and programs.

But before changing an app or program you should first make sure that it includes the latest updates. Go to the Windows Store and update the software. After that, proceed as follows:

First bring up the ‘search’ box as described under Uninstalling apps from the desktop above. Then:

  • In the search box, type Control Panel and then tap or click Control Panel.
  • Under the View By option, select Large Icons, and tap or click on Programs and features.
  • Select the program you want to install by tapping or clicking on it.
  • Tap or click on Change.

After this, you just follow the instructions shown on the screen.

Repairing a program

If an app or program is not working properly, you may be able to repair it.

However, if you got the app or program from the Windows Store, you should first make sure that it includes the latest updates. Go to the Store and update the software. After that, proceed as follows:

First bring up the ‘search’ box as described under Uninstalling apps from the desktop above. Then:

  • In the search box, type Control Panel and then tap or click Control Panel.
  • Under the View By option, select Large Icons, and tap or click on Programs and features.
  • Select the program you want to install by tapping or clicking on it.
  • Tap or click on Repair.

After this, you just follow the instructions shown on the screen.

Note: If you cannot see the repair option when you select the program then tap or click on Change to see if it includes a repair option.

If the repair is unsuccessful, you need to uninstall the app or program and then reinstall it.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Windows 8 Maintenance — Uninstalling, Changing and Repairing Programs


avatar

Paul Kennedy is the marketing manager of Jupiter Support (Ireland). He can be contacted by e-mail to paul@jupitersupport.ie. You can also go to jupitersupport.ie where you can use chat or Skype to talk with a technician free of charge. Alternatively you can call 0766803006 to speak to a technician and get free diagnosis/advice. Jupiter Support only charges a fixed fee of €19.99 to rid your computer of any and all viruses on a no-fix/no-fee basis.

The post Windows 8 Maintenance — Uninstalling, Changing and Repairing Programs appeared first on SiteProNews.

View full post on SiteProNews

By cranbak on July 1, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , , ,

End Of Support Changes Little About Windows XP’s Popularity

By cranbak on June 9, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , , , ,

Microsoft’s Free Windows To Come With Bings Attached – Re/code


Re/code
Microsoft's Free Windows To Come With Bings Attached
Re/code
That version, as the name implies, comes with the Bing search engine as the default within the Internet Explorer browser. Customers, of course, will be able to change the default search engine (or use an alternate browser). “This new edition will … I

and more »

View full post on Webmaster Internet – Google News

By cranbak on May 26, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , , , ,

China Bars Windows 8 on All Government Devices

China has banned Microsoft’s Windows 8 from new government computers, seemingly in retaliation for the technology firm’s decision to discontinue support for its aged XP operating system — an OS that remains popular in China.

Although the Chinese government made the announcement restricting the OS in a notice about the use of energy-saving products, Xinhua, the country’s official news source, says the government actually made the decision out of concerns for security.

“The Chinese government obviously cannot ignore the risks of running OS without guaranteed technical support,” Xinhua reported.

“It has moved to avoid the awkwardness of being confronted with a similar situation again in future if it continues to purchase computers with foreign OS.”

The Xinhua report indicated all desktops, laptops and tablet PCs purchased by central state bodies were affected by the decree, but the personal computer market should not be affected.

Microsoft said it was surprised by China’s decision, but said it would continue to offer older versions of its software to placate the government.

“We were surprised to learn about the reference to Windows 8 in this notice,” a spokesman told the BBC.

“Microsoft has been working proactively with the Central Government Procurement Centre and other government agencies through the evaluation process to ensure that our products and services meet all government procurement requirements. We have been and will continue to provide Windows 7 to government customers. At the same time we are working on the Window 8 evaluation with relevant government agencies.”

Microsoft pulled support for its 13-year-old operating system April 8, meaning there will be no more security updates.

Windows XP was released in 2001 and, although Microsoft originally planned to give it the axe back in 2010, its wildly unpopular replacement — Vista — convinced the company to hold off on discontinuing support for the older OS.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

China Bars Windows 8 on All Government Devices


avatar

The post China Bars Windows 8 on All Government Devices appeared first on SiteProNews.

View full post on SiteProNews

By cranbak on May 20, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , ,

Microsoft Patches IE, Even for WIndows XP Users

Microsoft has patched the critical flaw that has invaded Internet Explorer the past week, and even extended the fix to users of Window XP, its retired operating system.

Hackers last week discovered a security flaw in Microsoft’s browser that enabled the firm to launch “targeted attacks” against users of IE versions 6 through 11. The most common attack being leveraged against IE users was tricking them into visiting malicious websites. Known as “drive-bys,” these attacks enable a hacker to hit a vulnerable browser as soon as its user clicks on the malicious URL.

Microsoft, which will host a webcast today to discuss the fix it issued yesterday afternoon, said the update has been “fully tested” and released for all affected versions of the browser.

“The majority of customers have automatic updates enabled and will not need to take any action because protections will be downloaded and installed automatically,” said Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group manager Dustin Childs.

“If you’re unsure if you have automatic updates, or you haven’t enabled Automatic Update, now is the time. For those manually updating, we strongly encourage you to apply this update as quickly as possible following the directions in the released security bulletin.”

Customers are also being encouraged to upgrade to Internet Explorer 11.

Childs said although Microsoft opted to issue a security update for Windows XP, the company is still urging users to adopt a modern operating system, such as Windows 7 or 8.1.

Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing group director Tim Rains has been recommending for several months that XP users make the switch.

“When we release monthly security updates for supported versions of Windows, attackers will try and reverse engineer them to identify any vulnerabilities that also exist in Windows XP,” Rains said. “If they succeed, attackers will have the capability to develop exploit code to take advantage of them.”

“Microsoft Windows XP was released almost 12 years ago, which is an eternity in technology terms,” he added. “While we are proud of Windows XP’s success in serving the needs of so many people for more than a decade, inevitably there is a tipping point where dated software and hardware can no longer defend against modern day threats and increasingly sophisticated cyber-criminals.”

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Microsoft Patches IE, Even for WIndows XP Users


avatar

Jennifer Cowan is the Managing Editor for SiteProNews.

The post Microsoft Patches IE, Even for WIndows XP Users appeared first on SiteProNews.

View full post on SiteProNews

By cranbak on May 2, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , ,

Microsoft Patches IE Vulnerability, Even On Windows XP

The update that does this goes live today at 10 a.m. PDT.

View full post on WebmasterWorld

By cranbak on May 1, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , ,

Nearly 3 in 10 PCs Still Run Windows XP

By cranbak on April 21, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , ,

Replace Windows XP for Cheap

Microsoft’s support for Windows XP has officially ended.  Those systems still running XP are vulnerable to hackers accessing data or being turned into a bot-net to spread viruses and malware.  Maintaining an up-to-date anti-virus software isn’t enough to keep a system running XP secure.  It’s time to ditch XP once and for all.  Luckily, there are reasonably-priced options so that you can replace your XP relic without needing a second mortgage.

“Do I have to switch to Windows 8.1?  I hear it’s a big change from XP.”

It’s true that Windows XP users will feel more at home with Windows 7 than with Windows 8 which has some distinct and noticeable differences in appearance and navigation from earlier versions of Windows.  You don’t have to migrate to Windows 8.1 if you’d prefer to stick with a more familiar OS.  New PCs are available from most major retailers with Windows 7, though you won’t have as much selection as if you opt for Windows 8 and Microsoft plans to end support for that OS in 2020.

“Can I upgrade my existing machine to Windows 7?”

The short answer is, probably not.  If your PC came with Windows XP pre-installed, your hardware is likely to be at least 10 years old.  Even if you bought a top-of-the-line machine back then, it’s not going to be worth upgrading compared to buying a new PC.

The system requirements for Windows 7 are listed on Microsoft’s support site.  Compare the specifications listed with those of your PC, which you can find by right-clicking on My Computer and selecting properties. Keep in mind that the requirements listed are the bare minimum for the software to run, but to function moderately well without system crashes you’ll want at least 3GB of RAM (the requirements list 1GB or 2GB depending on your processor type) and 500GB of hardware space (to accommodate the OS as well as your other data and programs).

Spending $100 (or likely more) on the software and more to upgrade hardware isn’t a great investment when antiquated components could conk out at any time.  You can get a basic, low-end new PC for as little as $350 with hardware that will be drastically better than a 10 year old machine.

If you’ve been upgrading your hardware over the years and believe it’s capable of running Windows 7 as-is, your next hurdle will be getting your hands on the software to install Windows 7.  Microsoft is only supplying retailers with Windows 8.1, so you can’t walk into your local office supply store and pick up a Windows 7 upgrade disk.  A computer repair company may be able to get you an OEM version of Windows 7, but since OEM software is intended to be installed on a custom-build machine Microsoft frowns on service providers using it to upgrade.

Installing an OEM product will return your system to “factory-fresh,” meaning no data and no additional programs installed.  Before you install a new OS, you’ll need to do a full backup of your data and track down the installation software (and registration codes, if applicable) for everything you have installed on your machine that you’d like to continue using.

To be fair, this step isn’t much different from migrating your data to a new PC, other than that if you forget to transfer something you’ll still have it on your old PC.  If you backup your files, format your hard drive and install a new OS, there’s no way to go back a retrieve any information you forgot to backup.

“Can I get by for less than $500?”

For the hardware itself, absolutely.  A basic desktop tower running Windows 8.1 with 4GB or more of RAM and a 500GB or larger hard drive can be found for under $400, a laptop with similar specifications will run about $50-$100 more.  While online retailers like Newegg and Dell tend to offer the best prices, budget systems can be found at retailers like Costco or Best Buy.

If you’ll need professional assistance to get your data migrated, programs installed, and the new machine set up on your network, it will set you back more.

“Is there any way to get off the Windows train?”

Absolutely, but it may not be entirely painless.  There are some pretty amazing open-source Operating Systems that are completely free.  One option that basic users may find appealing (due to its polished appearance and compatibility with a large number of programs) is Linux Mint.  If you use your computer primarily to surf the net and update your Facebook status, making the move to Linux could be pretty painless.  With an open-source office product (like OpenOffice), you won’t even miss Word and Excel.

However, if you’re a hard-core Windows user who depends on a variety of Windows software, moving off a Windows platform could be more challenging.  Before you jump in and download Linux, make a list of the programs that you use regularly and determine if they’re compatible with the open-source OS, or if you’d be able to make do with the nearest compatible alternative.

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

Replace Windows XP for Cheap


avatar

Andrea Eldridge is CEO of Nerds On Call, which offers onsite computer and laptop repair service for homeowners and small businesses. Based in Redding, Calif., it has locations in five states. Contact Eldridge at www.callnerds.com/andrea.

The post Replace Windows XP for Cheap appeared first on SiteProNews.

View full post on SiteProNews

By cranbak on April 16, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , ,

Microsoft Dev Center Open For Universal Windows Apps and Windows Phone 8.1 Apps

“The Windows Phone Dev Center roll-out has begun and you should start seeing updates and new features later today.”

View full post on WebmasterWorld

By cranbak on April 15, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , , , ,

PC Numbers Down In First Quarter – Economy, Windows XP Support Blamed For Decline

Fewer PCs were shipped in the first quarter of 2014 when compared to the same period last year but the numbers, though down, are still better than analysts had projected.

Overall, 76.6 million units moved in the three months, that’s down 1.7 percent over the first three months of 2013. However, as reported by Gartner, the severity of the decline eased compared with the past seven quarters.

That ease can be linked to the end of XP support by Microsoft.

“All regions indicated a positive effect since the end of XP support stimulated the PC refresh of XP systems. Professional desktops, in particular, showed strength in the quarter,” Gartner principal analyst Mikako Kitagawa said in a press release. “Among key countries, Japan was greatly affected by the end of XP support, registering a 35 percent year-over-year increase in PC shipments. The growth was also boosted by sales tax change. We expect the impact of XP migration worldwide to continue throughout 2014.”

Numbers reported by the International Data Corporation were slightly different with a statement issued Wednesday stating 73.4 million units were shipped. Regardless of the difference, the XP factor was also pointed to as a contributing reason to number changes.

Loren Loverde, vice-president of Worldwide PC Trackers, pointed to the economy as also playing a role in the decline.

“The economic front seems to be gradually stabilizing and/or improving,” she said. “However, this has been a slow process, and it is unlikely that sovereign debt issues will be resolved soon or that growth in emerging markets like China will return to prior levels.

“On the technology front, the transition to more mobile devices and usage modes is unlikely to stop, although the short term impact on PC shipments may slow as tablet penetration rises – as we’ve begun to see in some mature regions. The net result remains consistent with our past forecasts – in particular, that there is potential for PC shipments to stabilize, but not much opportunity for growth.”

Post from: SiteProNews: Webmaster News & Resources

PC Numbers Down In First Quarter


avatar

W. Brice McVicar is a staff writer for SiteProNews.

The post PC Numbers Down In First Quarter appeared first on SiteProNews.

View full post on SiteProNews

By cranbak on April 11, 2014 | Webmaster
Tags: , , , , , , , ,